2019 SONORA RALLY RACE UPDATES


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SS5 & Podium: One Last Hurrah

An Epic Finish to Five Days of Racing in Sonora Make It Hard to Head Home

Friday, March 22nd, was a day which for many was bittersweet. The race was demanding, more than you might find at any other event of its kind in North America. And not just for the competitors, and their teams, but for everyone involved. Early mornings, late nights. In a constant state of motion, if not physically, then mentally and emotionally – and running on a tank about three-quarters empty. It’s not easy. There are moments when it’s not even fun. So, why is it as the time comes to say goodbye, there’s a sudden loss for words?

The first section of Special Stage Five was designed around a tightly wound, crisscrossing network of pathways, weaving through brush and bushes that’ll slap an unsuspecting co-driver in the face if they’re preoccupied. Race Director Darren Skilton called it “Africa Nav” – quick changes in direction with a pile of options to point the tires at any given time. For a brief stint, the course cruised down a bit of beach to then open-up onto wide, fast farm roads letting the pilots finish their final heat in full race fashion: on the gas.

At the heart of Hermosillo, Sonora’s state capital, waves of racers pulled into the bivouac for the last time. Under the Method Race Wheels archway, a lineup of the usual suspects – Ricky Brabec #2, Skyler Howes #1, Mike Johnson #33, among others – shook hands with Timing & Scoring and congratulated each other on a job well done. They obliged taking pictures with fans while they cooked in the desert sun waiting for clearance from Rally Comp. Motos were the first to pose under the Yokohama inflatable, continuing the photoshoot with their team members for the inevitable announcements on Social Media. Cars started showing up not long thereafter with the same wide grins pasted to the drivers’ faces. The biggest smile however was presumably Chris Blais’, who after being forced to retire from rally raid due to a fateful motorcycle accident in 2007, this day won the Yokohama Sonora Rally in a UTV. Initially hesitant, his wife had told him point-blank, “you’re going to the Sonora Rally.” And in true Blais fashion, he showed up, didn’t say much or very loudly, competed intelligently and took home the victory. Not bad for a 12-year hiatus.

“This is just an awesome experience. You know, I hurt got hurt in 2007 so this is my first rally, ever, back. And to come out win is…great! We had a great time…I want to thank my whole crew. They really put up with a lot. It’s a little harder to get around and all these other things we’ve got to do. My guys make it happen and make it possible so I can come out here, have a good time and live my dream.” – Chris Blais UTV #56, 2019 1st Place Champion in the Car Class

A man who’s supported the rally since the beginning, racing a truck and stock UTVs over the years, finally added some serious upgrades to his machine and came back last year to nab 2nd place. Well that man’s done it again, and standing onstage Friday night, giving a heartfelt speech and having a laugh were Dave Sykes and his co-driver Scott Steinberger #52. Mexico had more to celebrate than the average Friday night as their very own, Luis Javier Pelayo and Alfonso Alonzo Diaz #60, unsurprisingly took the 3rd proverbial step on the podium. Pelayo also received a free pass to the 2020 Dakar Rally after an arduous journey to the top of the Road to Dakarstandings. Likewise, Howes, who won this challenge the previous year, took the prize from a new segment added to the rally just this year: the Morocco Challenge. The winner is given the opportunity to race the Rallye Du Maroc in October, which takes competitors through portions of the Dakar Rally’s original route in North Africa. An epic way to end a week-long Battle Royale!

“Personally, it’s one of my favorite events that I’ve ever done. I really enjoy it. It’s awesome to visit Mexico [again] and see new places [here] that I haven’t seen. Great job on the organization, it was fabulous to come down and enjoy it. Everybody who participated in the race…You guys make it!” – Johnny Campbell, Monster Energy Honda Rally Team Manager

It’s an addiction, this rally thing. No matter how much it hurts. How burnt out or loopy they become. Or how much injury it inflicts, the junkies keep coming back more. Whether their fix is speed, dirt, motors, adventure or all of the above, what draws new and old customers alike is the execution. A fine-tuned production, served with a smile, feeding each craving – every relapse – like this might be the last chance you ever get to indulge. And like the hard stuff, rallying is a risk, deadly in fact. And when you’re not careful, it could consume your whole life… If only you were so lucky.

Key Notes

At the 2019 Yokohama Sonora Rally, Presented by Method Race Wheels, ICO Racing in-partnership with F2r unveiled a prototype they, and the FIM and ASO organizations interested, hope will change rally raid for the better. This all digital roadbook intends to demolish the need for “homework” and the now infamous Map Men, by allowing organizers to load pre-marked roadbook files onto the device in the morning at the start of each stage. Sonora Rally was the first of many trials with the equipment, and according to ICO owner, Dave Peckham, it went off without a hitch.

Top Ten Results as of SS5

MOTO PRO

  • Ricky Brabec #2

  • Skyler Howes #1

  • Mike Johnson #33

  • Aaron Richardson #15

  • Kevin Omo #18

  • Matt Sutherland #25

  • Radek Burkat #14

  • Kyle McCoy #31

  • David Pearson #10

  • Jim Pearson #10

Morocco Challenge results as of SS5

  • Skyler Howes #1

  • Mike Johnson #33

  • Aaron Richardson #15

  • Kevin Omo #18

  • Kyle McCoy #31

Road to Dakar Challenge results as of SS5

  • Luis Javier Pelayo #60

  • Jason Murray #69

  • Paul Broughton #72

  • George LaMonte #55

  • Christina Giampaoli #67

SUPPORT: A big THANKS to Yokohama Tire and Method Race Wheels for supporting the organization’s vision in bringing rally raid to North America. Thanks also goes to returning partners RALLY COMPMultitool-USAICO Racing and PCI Radios who have been great supporters of the rally since its inception. And at last, a special thanks to Sonora Turismo and the municipalities of San Luis, Peñasco, Caborca, Pitiquito and Hermosillo.

By: Justin W. Coffey & Kyra Sacdalan


S4: The Crescendo

The Rhythm of Sonora Rally Ventures Closer to the Conclusion

Thursday, March 21st, the five-day symphony of screaming engines climbs its way towards a momentous finish on Friday, but not before a big change in rhythm. Race Days One through Three offered all the drama – booming machines, mountainous dunes, game-ending crashes, heartbreaking mechanical issues and an invisible maze of baffling navigation. But after several days in the sand, Special Stage Four of the 2019 Yokohama Sonora Rally played a different, though still quite menacing, tune.

Day Four of racing offered other-worldly landscapes compared to its sandy counterparts, covered with smooth, salty, dry lake beds where pilots can really get on the gas. Ancient cacti added another element of danger crowding the racecourse in some places as the extended their spiky arms towards the explorers wound their way through. Washes were freshly eroded by recent rains, and riders took full advantage of the rails doing their best not to be made ping-pong balls at the center of the path. Although in some places, square-edged rounds two to three feet in dimension were ap to take out unsuspecting competitors going full-speed towards eminent glory. Eventually, the race cut westward towards the sea to let racers dip their tires in the ocean and cool off for 60km of multifaceted coastline, setting the scene, and slow the tempo, at the penultimate battle. And despite the many perils, everyone arrived at the bivouac in good spirits with plenty of new memories, for instance a special visit will the Seri people, an indigenous group of the Mexican state of Sonora.

All jokes aside, the day offered its fair share of twists, ending with a few small victories and several upsets. In surprising turn of events, 2018 Sonora Rally champion Skyler Howes #1 swiped the stage win – riding at his typical level of excellence, but without a single circumstantial setback. Minor navigational mistakes appeared to have caused #2 Ricky Brabec’s shift down the ladder, though as long as he crosses the Finish line in Hermosillo, it won’t affect his position on the podium. Rally raid’s most underrated fast-guy is the soft-spoken owner of Rally Comp, Mike Johnson #33, who’s been a regular on the North America rally circuit since he’d first hit the dirt. But the real excitement has been watching the motos duke it out in the Morocco Challenge, which offers the winner complimentary chance to race the Rallye du Maroc in October. Aaron Richardson #15 managed to keep Kyle McCoy #31 and Jim Pearson #10 at bay giving him almost a 2.5-hour lead and, quite possibly, the proverbial crown.

The song may have slowed by Day 5, but as the music comes to its inevitable end, melodies from the 2019 Yokohama Sonora Rally – presented by Method Race Wheels – might just make your favorite playlist.

Key Notes

  • The Adventure Raid group are having fantastic time with the tour guide, who has been leading them through small sections of the course at a leisurely pace – avoiding the strain of racing and long kilometers of torturous terrain. It’s been the perfect way to expose rally raid to a variety of off-road enthusiast with a variety of backgrounds.

  • Unlike in Baja California, another hub for off-road racing, a large percentage of Sonoran roads or trails which the rally runs as the race course on are rarely used, even by locals. Some of these paths are completely abandoned, 90% of which have gone back to nature. These are considered “faint roads” to the locals because they are almost impossible to see, even as they are being traversed.

Top Ten Results as of SS4

MOTO PRO

  • Ricky Brabec #2

  • Skyler Howes #1

  • Mike Johnson #33

  • Aaron Richardson #15

  • Kevin Omo #18

  • Matt Sutherland #25

  • Radek Burkat #14

  • Kyle McCoy #31

  • David Pearson #10

  • Vasile Scurtu #21

Morocco Challenge results as of SS4

  • Aaron Richardson #15

  • Kyle McCoy #31

  • Jim Pearson #10

  • Pete Caldwell #26

  • Graeme Sharp #5

Road to Dakar Challenge results as of SS4

  • Javier Luis Pelayo #60

  • Dave Sykes #52

  • Jason Murray #69

  • Paul Broughton #72

  • George LaMonte #55

SONORA RALLY LIVE RESULTS! Sonora Rally will be posting Stories Live Results on the website after every stage each night. Check in every night for the Provisional Standings: http://sonorarally.com/liveresults.html

 SUPPORT: A big THANKS to Yokohama Tire and Method Race Wheels for supporting the organization’s vision in bringing rally raid to North America. Thanks also goes to returning partners RALLY COMPMultitool-USAICO Racing and PCI Radios who have been great supporters of the rally since its inception. And at last, a special thanks to Sonora Turismo and the municipalities of San Luis, Peñasco, Caborca, Pitiquito and Hermosillo.

Justin W. Coffey & Kyra Sacdalan


SS3: Getting Over the Hump

Midway Through the Five-Day Rally, Pilots Still Have Plenty of Fight Left 

Wednesday, March 20th marked the end of the road for some key players. The journey from Puerto Peñasco to Puerto Libertad was a demanding one indeed, shedding substantial weight from the rankings. But a war still wages on among those left to fight these final two battles. 

Challenging navigation seems to be a trend this year, as are the epic landscapes and formidable terrain – quite akin to what teams faced at the Dakar Rally last January. Though the racecourse broke free of the dunes for most of the event’s third Special Stage, what little of the deep sand was seen still caught many pilots off-guard. Cliffsides would literally drop out just over the crest, like having a rug pulled out from under you…but you’re moving at race-pace with a ten-foot fall ahead of you. Obstacles which a roadbook can only do so much to help the riders and drivers really anticipate. But before they hit the dunes, competitors traversed ranchland, fields of cacti which grew dense as they weaved their way closer to the mountains. And then, the horizon opened up into quick, wide vistas of desert, only to close back up again.

Unsurprisingly, we saw the same two faces at the front of the Pro Moto class: Ricky Brabec #2 and Skyler Howes #1. Howes was making good time and could have probably nabbed his first stage win of the race if not for his navigation tower rattling of his bike and snapping in two. Duct tape to the rescue, he was back on-course in a flash, but unfortunately, not fast enough to catch up with Ricky. Charging through their wake, in third overall is Rally Comp’s very own Mike Johnson #33 while Pro Aaron Richardson #15 follows by nearly hour. In the Enduro class, Matt Sutherland #25 holds the lead above Kyle McCoy #31 and Vasile Scurtu #21.

Even if Richardson doesn’t take a place on the podium this year, he seems a shoo-in to win the Morocco Challenge – distances between the riders begin at a two-plus hour gap – which offers complimentary admittance to race to the Rallye du Maroc in October to the champion. Although in rally raid, it’s a fool’s errand to try and place a victor before the finale, though for whichever bike triumphs, it will be in for a treat. This historic event samples sections of the original Dakar Rally route through Northern Africa, an envious experience for those (only) fortunate enough to compete in the “Big Show” in South America. But with talks of Dakar packing up and journeying back over the Atlantic in 2020, the winner of the Road to Dakar just might find themselves in similar regions. One can only hope. Though Chris Blais #56 continues to dominate the UTV class, he is ineligible to compete in this segment as he has already raced Dakar in 2007 – on a motorcycle, nabbing 3rd place overall. Yeah, he’s fast. In whatever he tries, it seems. And lucky for the current contenders, Dave Sykes #52 and Javier Luis Pelayo #60, Blais isn’t in competition for that highly coveted free entry.  

“We’ve gone through some tough days – the longest stages we’ve ever run in the dunes. A super long-distance stage today [Wednesday], which everyone completed with good time. So, we’re kind of over the hump now. There are two short, really beautiful stages to come, with a couple tricks added in which could still wreak havoc on the final standings because of the navigation – especially on the last day. Pretty excited to be in Puerto Libertad again, it’s been a couple years… Great food, great time, great views.”  – Darren Skilton, Yokohama Sonora Rally Race Director

In the UTV class and overall, Blais, Sykes and Pelayo make three the points of a crown placed at the head with Eric Pucelik #51 driving into Fourth overall and First in the N2WD segment, while Ben Swain #63 is leading the N4x4s. It’s not all good news, however, as the circumstances of the field and requirements of the day knocked out some heavy hitters. We’d already lost Moto Pros Justin Morgan #6 and Garrett Poucher #4 to Special Stage 2, but now the event is giving the peace sign to Joe Bolton #54 in the UTV class. As well as a reluctant pair: Scott Bright #7 who went over his handlebars due to a precarious cattle guard, resulting in a yet undiagnosed shoulder injury. Though you won’t see this incident reflected in the standings as Bright chose to ride the remaining 100-plus kilometers of the special and liaison to the bivouac. Another loss, who likewise refused to accept a DNF that day, Wes Van Nieuwhuise endured a tremendous off-bike episode causing some serious neck pains which were enough to keep him from continuing the rally.   

“Everything was going really smoothly until today, when both team riders, Scott Bright and Wes Van Nieuwhuise, were injured. Unfortunately, they are out for the rest of the event, but everybody’s doing well which is better than what can be expected at the speeds those two are racing.”  – Alex Martins, Rally Pan Am Team Owner

Key Notes

  • As of Special Stage 3, four racers in the Moto class have received a DNF; one racer has received a DNF in the UTV class.

  •  The Yokohama Sonora Rally presented by Method Race Wheels has welcomed to it an “Expert Developer” iteration of the Moto class, which allows the riders to compete – though not for the overall title – while field-testing innovations to motorsports. And in this case, what could be the new standard for rally racing. With heated debate over “Map Men” and homework taking place at rallies, this digital roadbook being developed by ICO Racing and F2r (free-to-ride) specifically for FIM, ASO and other premier off-road rally circuits is a hopeful solution to the unfair advantages believed to spawn from teams having roadbooks in their possession overnight. 

 

Results by Class as of SS3

 MOTO PRO

  • Ricky Brabec #2

  • Skyler Howes #1

  • Mike Johnson #33

  • Aaron Richardson #15

  • Kevin Omo #18

 MOTO ENDURO

  • Matt Sutherland #25

  • Kyle McCoy #31

  • Vasile Scurtu #21

  • Hari Iddamsetty #12

  • Pete Caldwell #26

MOTO EXP

  • Matthew Glade #17

  • Luke Bennett #24 

Morocco Challenge results as of SS3

  • Aaron Richardson #15 

  • Kyle McCoy #31

  • Jim Pearson #10

  • Pete Caldwell #26

  • Dave Martin #27 

Road to Dakar Challenge results as of SS3

  • Dave Sykes #52

  • Javier Luis Pelayo #60 

  • Jason Murray #69

  • Paul Broughton #72

  • George LaMonte #55

SONORA RALLY LIVE RESULTS! Sonora Rally will be posting Stories Live Results on the website after every stage each night. Check in every night for the Provisional Standings: http://sonorarally.com/liveresults.html

SUPPORT: A big THANKS to Yokohama Tire and Method Race Wheels for supporting the organization’s vision in bringing rally raid to North America. Thanks also goes to returning partners RALLY COMPMultitool-USAICO Racing and PCI Radios who have been great supporters of the rally since its inception. And at last, a special thanks to Sonora Turismo and the municipalities of San Luis, Peñasco, Caborca, Pitiquito and Hermosillo.

Justin W. Coffey & Kyra Sacdalan


SS2: Please Sir, May I Have Another

A Rally This Savory Needs to Be Indulged…
(But Too Much Good Stuff Could Lead to An Upset)

Competitors left the bivouac near El Golfo de Santa Clara Tuesday morning and somewhere along the liaison were transported to Mars. No, Venus. It was much hotter than a rock four planets away from the sun. The further inland the pilots ventured, the more stifling the weather became. We’ve seen this scene before, or something like it, at the Dakar Rally. This year, Peru’s monstrous dunes dwarfed even race-spec garbage trucks. And yesterday in the best sandbox Sonora has to offer, racers felt the magnificence of the landscape which lay ahead. Several succumbed to the trials – DNFs, minor injuries, on-course repairs and running out of fuel. Just another day at the races. But for many, this is what they live for. With no challenge there’s nothing left to win, to achieve, and making it to the finish in one piece, let alone in decent time, this day, was an accomplishment well-earned.

Puerto Peñasco welcomed racers into a large parking lot alongside the beach in the midst of transformation into Bivouac Number Three. Grilled meats were prepared seaside and treats were a small gesture for the weary teams. Those familiar faces had entered the winner’s circle hours before the rest of the pack – Ricky Brabec #2 coming in a solid 20 minutes before Skyler Howes #1, who had likewise built a wide gap between he and the next rider. Both riders appeared unfazed by the stage, even expressing enthusiasm about taking on the dunes. Brabec mentioned in passing that he prefers the pace in the sand and explained it can actually be easier to hit waypoints on the bullseye. Howes’, the 2018 Sonora Rally champion, applied all the skills and experience he’d picked up from racing the 2019 Dakar to what was once a personally dreaded section of the racecourse.

“I was definitely looking forward to the big dunes day today. Last year I struggled on this stage but after my experience in Dakar I was excited to see how my navigation and skill improved. I felt great and had a lot of fun, the navigation was tricky in some spots, but I was able to nail it. These dunes are huge, but after Peru, my perspective changed, and I was definitely less intimidated by them which helped my overall speed.” – Skyler Howes #1, Garrett Off-Road Racing Team

Every epic battle has casualties. The rally bid farewell to top contender after Garrett Poucher #4 who reportedly suffered a knee injury in the first quarter of Special Stage Two and was forced to leave the podium in the very capable hands of his teammate, Skyler Howes. And although the young rider has a clear shot to the steps, he feels sure his chances at a second winning title have slipped through his fingers due to unforeseen issues with fuel capacity.

“My biggest issue is coming from my fuel mileage, and the last 30km of today’s special I had to ride at 30% in order to save my fuel and make it into the gas check, which hurt my time in a big way. So, after yesterday’s 25+ minute fuel delay, and today’s slow down, I’m well off the lead, which is frustrating because it would have been fun to test myself against Ricky. But! I’m headed into day three happy, healthy and having a great time.” Skyler Howes #1, Garrett Off-Road Racing team

Cars & UTVs have seen a fair share of mishaps as well, but one man who’s notably climbed to the top of the pack is none other than former pro motorbike racer, Chris Blais #49. As if meant for it all along, his knowledge navigating from behind a set of bars has applied nicely to his new position holding a wheel. Although he can’t breathe easy yet, Javier Luis Pelayo #60, Dave Sykes #52, and Eric Pucelik #52 have been Blais’ toughest adversaries throughout the week so far, all vying for the first, second and third positions. But with three stages left, could an underdog emerge from the four-wheeled pack to take the victory? Or will the fearsome letters “DNF” claim another handful of victims and reorganize the lineup?

If nothing else, SS2 gave the teams perspective. Showing them, each of those involved, their limits. There needs to be one of these in ever rally raid: a defining moment. A stage which separates the field to reveal those who have mastered both navigation and navigating the terrain (these things are different). These are the stages which put a sharp focus on certain competitors, commanders of their craft, doing the impossible. It’s why we the viewers can’t peel our eyes away from the screen. Why we travel hundreds of miles to have our favorites fly by, once, and if luck would have it, we just might catch a whiff of exhaust. A stage like yesterday’s is why we chow-down on any digestible content served to us from a clickable dot-com menu. To choose to race is already a feat alone. Deliberately putting one’s self through hell and back for, quite often, absolutely nothing. Nothing but memories, that is. But to witness (wo)man master machine in such breathtaking ways over seemingly impassable wilderness, with only gibberish on a paper scroll as a guide, dominating over a group of 60-plus? Now that’s a dish worth going back for seconds…or thirds.

Live Results SS2.JPG

SONORA RALLY LIVE RESULTS! Sonora Rally will be posting Stories Live Results on the website after every stage each night. Check in every night for the Provisional Standings: http://sonorarally.com/liveresults.html

 SUPPORT: A big THANKS to Yokohama Tire and Method Race Wheels for supporting the organization’s vision in bringing rally raid to North America. Thanks also goes to returning partners RALLY COMPMultitool-USAICO Racing and PCI Radios who have been great supporters of the rally since its inception. And at last, a special thanks to Sonora Turismo and the municipalities of San Luis, Peñasco, Caborca, Pitiquito and Hermosillo.

Justin W. Coffey & Kyra Sacdalan


SS1: Touched for the Very First Time

Virgin Land Put Up a Fight as the Sonora Rally Invaded Unknown Territories

Journeying from the border town of San Luis Río Colorado all the way to Campo La Salina – a salt flat, boasting a new temporary lagoon from the recent weather, the Fifth Annual Yokohama Sonora Rally, Presented by Method Race Wheels, ventured into new territories unseen in previous iterations. Terrain untouched by man, fought tooth and nail to remain unsullied… To no avail. While earth may not have won the battle, it left scars on all the racers attempting to cross it. Morning dunes inflicted physical pain with camel grass making a fatiguing set of mini moguls along the slopes. As the demand on their bodies wound down, the demand on their minds took over, and for the final 60 kilometers of racing, pilots faced several challenges navigating the special. With recent storms passing through Sonora, and no time to rerun (and remap) the course, much of it had washed away or morphed into something unrecognizable from the scroll. 

 “Stage One, [of the] Sonora Rally, was more or less a marathon night, which is pretty cool. Who doesn’t like camping out in the middle of the desert? Although, Stage One was more of a warm up, it wasn’t very easy. And the ending was tough So, I’m happy to be at the Finish line.” - – Ricky Brabec #2, Monster Energy HRC Team Rider

The first day of racing at the Yokohama Sonora Rally was unforgiving. Scoured out valleys made for tricky, if not downright frustrating, navigation. Many became lost, more than once. Several received penalties for minor infractions in strict speed zones. While others suffered more severe conflicts, with a few UTVs even tumbling down the vast mountainous piles of loose, khaki granules. One team of two both ran out of gas as they learned (the hard way) of their brand-new bikes’ true fuel capacities. But such is rally raid. Where adversaries become allies as, in this case, a couple of front-runners each rescued their own, for lack of a better term, damsel in distress – losing precious time which will unlikely be returned. 

It wasn’t all for nothing. The top finishers were still in a tightknit group at the end, all things considered. Ricky Brabec #2 won the stage, with Justin Morgan #6, Skyler Howes #1 and Mike Johnson #33 (founder of Rally Comp) taking seats just seconds behind him. Former pro motorcycle racer, Chris Blais #49 is leading the pack of Cars & UTVs in his premiere rally behind a wheel. And Erik Pucelik #51 just after, the only other vehicle on four-wheels to breach the Top Ten. Garrett Poucher #4 just barely made it in at 9th Place, though he was one of the two bikes which had ran out of gas, needing to be towed to the highway for an impromptu pitstop. One can only imagine how fast he would have had to be going to have lost that much time and still finished among the elite! 

 As one would expect from an organization which prides itself on racer satisfaction, the environment was epic. The Old Mexican roadways unmolested by daily traffic. A dry lake bed added character to the obstacles early on. And after a short section of challenging dunes, the stage turned towards the ocean. Though it was there, by the lighthouse, the wayfinding became fruitless. The world had transformed in a week, and now, this paper scroll, a treasure map in-fact, which typically guided users toward a stage-winning finish, instead sent them on a wild goose chase for that coveted sound. Ding! goes the Waypoint… But that’s what it’s all about. Putting yourself to the test. Draining body and mind of all its energy and still finding a way to the bivouac. 

 “Tomorrow, I think the rally is really going to start and today was a good warm up, so I’m looking forward to the rest of the week.” – Ricky Brabec, Monster Energy HRC Team Rider” – Brabec

 If nothing else, teams can look at SS1 as Brabec has: a warm up. Check it off the list and move on. Enjoy a glass of local wine, chow down on pieces of succulent lamb cooked whole above a wood fire, rub elbows with racing legends, sleep under the stars and just be grateful they lived to ride another day. Because you never know what tomorrow will bring, you just have to be ready to roll with the punches. 

SONORA RALLY LIVE RESULTS! Sonora Rally will be posting Stories Live Results on the website after every stage each night. Check in every night for the Provisional Standings: http://sonorarally.com/liveresults.html

 SUPPORT: A big THANKS to Yokohama Tire and Method Race Wheels for supporting the organization’s vision in bringing rally raid to North America. Thanks also goes to returning partners RALLY COMPMultitool-USAICO Racing and PCI Radios who have been great supporters of the rally since its inception. And at last, a special thanks to Sonora Turismo and the municipalities of San Luis, Peñasco, Caborca, Pitiquito and Hermosillo.

Justin W. Coffey & Kyra Sacdalan

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